Saturday, May 9, 2015

Black Youth `Seasonally Adjusted' Unemployment Rate Increases To 27.5 Percent In April 2015

Between March and April 2015, the official “seasonally adjusted” unemployment rate for Black youths between 16 and 19 years-of-age in the United States increased from 25 to 27.5 percent; while the number of unemployed Black youths increased by 26,000 (from 161,000 to 187,000) during the same period, according to recently released “seasonally adjusted” Bureau of Labor Statistics data. 
The official “seasonally adjusted” jobless rate for Latino youths between 16 and 19 years-of-age in the United States was still 18.9 percent in April 2015; while the number of Latino youths between 16 and 19 years-of-age in the U.S. labor force decreased by 30,000 (from 1,187,000 to 1,157,000) between March and April 2015, according to the “seasonally adjusted” data..

The official “seasonally adjusted” unemployment rate for white youths between 16 and 19 years-of-age was still 14.5 percent in April 2015; while the number of white youths between 16 and 19 years-of-age in the U.S. labor force decreased by 36,000 (from 4,584,000 to 4,548,000) between March and April 2015, according to the “seasonally adjusted” data..

The official “seasonally adjusted” jobless rate for all youths (Black, Latino, white and Asian-American) between 16 and 19 years-of-age in the United States was still 17.1 percent in April 2015; while the “seasonally adjusted” total number of youths between 16 and 19 years-of-age in the United States who still had jobs decreased by 20,000 (from 4,804,000 to 4,784,000) between March and April 2015. In addition, the “seasonally adjusted” total number of youths between 16 and 19 years-of-age in the U.S. labor force decreased by 55,000 (from 5,824,000 to 5,769,000) between March and April 2015; while the “seasonally adjusted” number of youths between 16 and 19 years-of-age not in the U.S. labor force increased by 49,000 (10,800,000 to 10,849,000) during the same period.

The official “seasonally adjusted” jobless rate for Black male workers over 20 years-of-age in the United States was still 9.2 percent in April 2015; while the “seasonally adjusted” unemployment rate for all Black workers in the United States (youth, male and female) was also still 9.6 percent during that same month. In addition, in April 2015, the official “seasonally adjusted” jobless rate for Black female workers over 20 years-of-age in the United States was still 8.8 percent.

Between March and April 2015, the official “seasonally adjusted” unemployment rate for Latino male workers over 20 years-of-age increased from 5.8 to 6 percent; while the official “seasonally adjusted” jobless rate for all Latino workers (youth, male and female) in the United States increased from 6.9 to 6.9 percent during that same period. In addition, the official “seasonally adjusted” unemployment rate for Latina female workers over 20 years-of-age increased from 6.5 to 6.9 percent between March and April 2015; while the “seasonally adjusted” number of unemployed Latina female workers over 20 years-of-age increased by 45,000 (from 680,000 to 725,000) during the same period.

Between March and April 2015, the “seasonally adjusted” number of unemployed Asian-American workers in the United States increased by 106,000 (from 288,000 to 394,000);.while the official “seasonally adjusted” unemployment rate for Asian-American workers in the United States increased from 3.2 to 4.4 percent during the same period..
 
The official “seasonally adjusted” jobless rate for white female workers over 20 years-of-age in the United States was still 4.2 percent in April 2015; while the official “seasonally adjusted” unemployment rate for white male workers over 20 years-of-age was still 4.4 percent during that same month. In addition, the “seasonally adjusted” unemployment rate for all white workers (youth, male and female) was still 4.7 percent in April 2015; while the “seasonally adjusted” total number of white workers who still had jobs decreased by 167,000 (from 117, 886,000 to 117,719,000) between March and April 2015. During the same period, the “seasonally adjusted” number of white workers in the U.S. labor force also decreased by 229,000 (from 123,739,000 to 123,510,00) and the “seasonally adjusted” number of white workers not in the U.S. labor force increased by 321,000 (from 72,743,000 to 73,064,000).

The official “seasonally adjusted” jobless rate for all female workers over 16 years-of-age in the United States increased from 5.3 to 5.4 percent between March and April 2015; while the official “seasonally adjusted” unemployment rate for all female workers over 20 years-of-age was still 4.9 percent in April 2015. In addition, the official “seasonally adjusted” jobless rate for all male workers over 16 years-of-age in the United States was still 5.5 percent in April 2015; while the official “seasonally adjusted” unemployment rate for all male workers over 20 years-of-age was still 5 percent during that same month.

In April 2015, the official “seasonally adjusted” total number of unemployed workers in the United States was still 8,549,000; while the official unemployment rate for all U.S. workers (male, female and youth) was still 5.4 percent during that same month, according to the “seasonally adjusted” data

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ May 8, 2015 press release:

“…The unemployment rate was essentially unchanged at 5.4 percent, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today...Mining employment continued to decline...In April, both the unemployment rate (5.4 Percent) and the number of unemployed persons (8.5 million) were essentially unchanged....

“Among the major worker groups, the unemployment rate for Asians increased to 4.4 percent. The rates for adult men (5.0 percent), adult women (4.9 percent), teenagers (17.1 percent), whites 4.7 percent), blacks (9.6 percent), and Hispanics (6.9 percent) showed little or no change in April....

“…The number of long-term unemployed (those jobless for 27 weeks or more) changed little at 2.5 million, accounting for 29.0 percent of the unemployed….

“The number of persons employed part time for economic reasons (sometimes referred to as involuntary part-time workers) was little changed at 6.6 million in April....These individuals, who would have preferred full-time employment, were working part time because their hours had been cut back or because they were unable to find a full-time job.

“In April, 2.1 million persons were marginally attached to the labor force, little changed over the year…These individuals were not in the labor force, wanted and were available for work, and had looked for a job sometime in the prior 12 months. They were not counted as unemployed because they had not searched for work in the 4 weeks preceding the survey…

“Among the marginally attached, there were 756,000 discouraged workers in April, little different from a year earlier....Discouraged workers are persons not currently looking for work because they believe no jobs are available for them....

“….Employment declined over the month in nonresidential building construction (-8,000)….Employment in mining fell by 15,000 in April, with most of the job losses in support activities for mining (-10,000) and in oil and gas extraction (-3,000). Since the beginning of the year, employment in mining has declined by 49,000, with losses concentrated in support activities for mining.

“Employment in....manufacturing, wholesale trade, retail trade, information, financial activities, leisure and hospitality, and government showed little change over the month…


“The change in total nonfarm payroll employment….for March was revised from +126,000 to +85,000. With these revisions, employment gains in February and March combined were 39,000 lower than previously reported….”

Tuesday, May 5, 2015

Australian Anti-War Activist Joan Coxsedge's April 26, 2015 Letter


(The following letter from Australian anti-war and Latin American solidarity activist Joan Coxsedge—who is also a former member of the Victoria state parliament--originally appeared in an Australian-Cuban solidarity group’s newsletter)

"April 26, 2015

"Dear Comrades,

"Anzac Day has come and gone.  Thank god.  When I was a kid, it was a day of reflection and sadness, a quiet day to remember the terrible devastation and loss of our young, not only in Gallipoli but during the four appalling years of war when every second family suffered a bereavement and two in every three Australians in uniform were ether killed or wounded, some so terribly they were kept out of sight. And at wars end, the great army of damaged silent men returned home.

"No jingoism, no glorification, just deep private grief with no bodies or gravestones. In their place, memorials sprung up throughout the land with a digger on top sporting a slouched hat. On the sides, the names of the dead carved in stone. Not a noble war fought for noble motives but a war between empires for control of trade.

"But in this 100th anniversary year, Gallipoli has become an event, the place to be along with the nonsensical when we came of age, and weve been swamped with hard-sell commercialised pro-war drivel that plumbed new depths with Camp Gallipoli where deluded idiots shelled out their hard-earned to camp under the stars for an authentic Gallipoli experience minus the stench of the dead, the mud, the shellfire, the fear, the madness and rancid food. 

"PM Abbott babbled on about magnificent defeat and terrible victory after trying to cut back the wages of serving soldiers and reducing their pensions. Did he know that the bombs raining down on the Anzacs while trapped on the beach were sold to the Turks by the British company Woolwich Arsenal? Imagine their fury. And their anger at the wholesale corruption that infests our society, the growing gap between rich and poor, the terror raids with police bashing down doors and the disgraceful attack on trade unions by a hand-picked anti-worker royal commission.

"And what about the almost-signed Trans-Pacific Partnership, a secretive agreement being rammed through without any public debate.  Partnership?  My foot. The TPPs been cooked up by giant corporations with no democratic input.

"In November 2013, Julian Assange released a 95-page draft text of the proposed chapter on Intellectual Property Rights that laid out the provisions to institute a far-reaching transnational legal and enforcement regime with implications for individual rights, civil liberties, publishing, internet service providers and internet privacy as well as for anything creative, intellectual and environmental. Litigation tribunals to which sovereign national courts are expected to defer will have no human rights safeguards.

"As Julian Assange says: If instituted, the TPPs regime would trample over individual rights and free expressionIf you read, write, publish, think, listen, dance, sing or invent; if you farm or consume food; if youre ill now or might be one day, the TPP has you in its crosshairs.

"But the rich will do very nicely thank you.  I keep raising the TPP because once its signed, thats it.  And when you look at the Federal Liberal goose in charge of negotiating with the Yankees, Andrew Robb (great opportunities for business), you know were going to be done like a dinner.

John Pilger reminds us of the war weve continued to wage against our own indigenous people, one we dont care to talk about. Abbott slashed $534 million from indigenous social programmes, with$160 million from health and $13.4 million from their legal aid budgets. To our shame, the number of Aboriginal people hospitalised for self-harm has increased, especially among the young, but Abbott then had the gall to attack a long standing commitment to homelands as a lifestyle choice.   As bad as apartheid South Africa?

"In the last few days, a number of US media outlets have reported that the US State Department is claiming that the Cuban and US governments are discussing the potential removal of Cuba from its list of State Sponsors of Terrorism with the suggestion that an issue under review is the return of various US revolutionaries and radicals currently living in exile in Cuba. One is Assata Shakur who was given political asylum in Cuba in 1984 after escaping from a New Jersey prison five years earlier. 

"Assata had been convicted of murder in 1977 over the death of Trooper Foerster despite the absence of fingerprints on any weapon or powder residue on her hands. She was shot twice while her arms were raised, paralysing her right arm, making it impossible for her to fire a gun, and was then shot again from the back. Taken to hospital, she was threatened, beaten and tortured and later convicted in a trial she described as a legal lynching.

"In 1979, a delegation from the UN Commission on Human Rights visited Assata in prison and reported that political activists like her had been selectively targeted for provocation, false arrests, entrapment, fabrication of evidence and false criminal prosecutions.   A reminder of Washingtons appalling treatment of the Cuban Five. 

"We live in demented times but no amount of money or trade could justify sending good comrades back to the hell of US prisons.  Anyone negotiating with Washington crooks needs a long spoon and permanent amnesia. The US breaks treaties with impunity, from old ones with Native Americans to recent ones with Ukraine to confine the eastward expansion of NATO, even to reparation promised to Vietnam but never paid.

"Cuba knows Americas track record better than most. Hated by Washington since its successful Revolution, but respected and admired by millions around the world who believe that fighting US imperialism is a just and worthy cause. Freedom is non-negotiable.  Viva Cuba!

"Joan Coxsedge"

                                                                                      

Thursday, April 23, 2015

Fall River, Massachusetts' `Not Seasonally Adjusted' Jobless Rate: Still 10.1 Percent In March 2015


In March 2015, the official “not seasonally adjusted” unemployment rate in Fall River, Massachusetts was still 10.1 percent; while Massachusetts’ “not seasonally adjusted” jobless rate was still 5.5 percent during that same month, according to Bureau of Labor Statistics data.

The official “not seasonally adjusted” unemployment rate in 7 other major Massachusetts cities and in the town of North Adams was still higher than the “not seasonally adjusted” national U.S. unemployment rate of 5.6 percent in March 2015:

1. The official “not seasonally adjusted” jobless rate in Lawrence, Massachusetts was still 9.6 percent in March 2015;

2. The official “not seasonally adjusted” unemployment rate in New Bedford, Massachusetts was still 9.6 percent in March 2015;

3. The official “not seasonally adjusted” jobless rate in Springfield, Massachusetts was still 9 percent in March 2015;

4. The official “not seasonally adjusted” unemployment rate in North Adams, Massachusetts was still 7.8 percent in March 2015;

5. The official “not seasonally adjusted” jobless rate in Brockton, Massachusetts was still 6.6 percent in March 2015;

6. The official “not seasonally adjusted” unemployment rate in Lowell, Massachusetts was still 6.3 percent in March 2015;

7. The official “not seasonally adjusted” jobless rate in Pittsfield, Massachusetts was still 6.2 percent in March 2015;

8. The official “not seasonally adjusted” unemployment rate in Worcester, Massachusetts was still 5.7 percent in March 2015;

In addition, the official “not seasonally adjusted” jobless rate in Lynn, Massachusetts was still 5.4 percent in March 2015; while the official “not seasonally adjusted” unemployment rate in Boston, Massachusetts was still 4.2 percent during that same month.

According to the Massachusetts’ Executive Office of Labor and Workforce Development’s April 16, 2015 press release:

“….Information had no change….in its jobs level over the month….Construction lost 2,100…jobs over the month….Financial Activities lost 500….jobs over the month….Government lost 200….jobs over the month…”


In March 2015, the “not seasonally adjusted” number of unemployed workers in Massachusetts was still 181,100; and around 49,000 of these officially unemployed workers lived in Boston, Brockton, Fall River, Lawrence, Lowell, Lynn, New Bedford, Pittsfield, Springfield, Worcester or North Adams, according to the “not seasonally adjusted” data. 

Tuesday, April 21, 2015

The `New York Times'' Mexican Billionaire Connection Revisited: Conclusion


New York Times Owner Slim’s U.S. Real Estate Investments

In New York City and other U.S. cities, Slim has also apparently been purchasing more real estate property since he purchased stock in Citigroup and the New York Times Company in 2008. As Adam Piore noted in an Oct. 1, 2010 article in The Real Deal article:

“…New Yorkers know him as…the man who…dropped $44 million on the Duke Semans Mansion on the Upper East Side, but Mexican billionaire Carlos Slim has plenty of other real estate holdings outside of New York...While Slim has beefed up his New York real estate portfolio lately, he’s also made moves like gaining control of a prime half-billion-dollar property in Beverly Hills…His New York purchases were made through Inmobiliaria Carso, a closely held entity for Slim’s family that is not required to release as much information… Slim ponied up $140 million in June to buy 417 Fifth Avenue from a joint venture of the Moinian Group and Goldman Sachs’ Whitehall Street Real Estate Fund…."

So don’t expect The New York Times to start publishing many new expose’s of the New York City real estate industry if Mexican Billionaire Oligarch and Philip Morris International board member Carlos Slim increases his share of New York Times Company stock to 19 percent in 2015.


(end of article)

Monday, April 20, 2015

The `New York Times'' Mexican Billionaire Connection Revisited: Part 15


New York Times Owner Slim’s Foreign Investments

Whatever happens within Mexico with regard to anti-monopoly legislation or human rights violations, New York Times Owner Slim and his family’s ability to accumulate billions of dollars each decade may still not be affected that much as long as the capitalist economic system exists around the globe, because an increasing percentage of his 21st-century profits have been coming from his investments in countries other than Mexico in recent years. As an article in the July 20, 2014 issue of Bloomberg Business Week observed:

Slim said this week that his America Movil…is bowing to antitrust legislation by selling assets in Mexico to reduce its dominant market share…While America Movil will be reducing dependence on its home market, the world’s second-richest man has been diversified beyond Mexico and telecommunications for years with holdings in banking, mining and construction…America Movil has also expanded, with operations in 17 other countries, from the U.S. to Chile. It also holds stakes in two European phone carriers, Royal KPN NV and Telekom Austria AG…With about 60 percent of America Movil’s sales coming from outside of Mexico today…Slim’s fortune is less dependent on his home country than it used to be…”


In addition, “through America Movil,” New York Times Owner Slim also “committed $60 million” to an Israeli startup, “Mobli as a model of the type of potential investments in Israeli firms,” according to Forbes magazine (12/21/13).

(end of part 15)

Sunday, April 19, 2015

The `New York Times'' Mexican Billionaire Connection Revisited: Part 14


Mexico’’s Human Rights Situation and Mexico’s Oligarchs

Despite the passage in 2013 of an anti-monopoly reform bill that would reduce Slim’s share of the Mexican telecommunications consumer market to below 50 percent, the human rights situation in a Mexico whose economy remains dominated by billionaire oligarchs like New York Times Owner Slim still needed improvement. As a 2014 Human Rights Watch (HRW) report, for example, observed:

“Upon taking office in December 2012, [Mexican] President Enrique Peña Nieto acknowledged that the``war on drugs’ launched by predecessor Felipe Calderón had led to serious abuses by the security forces. In early 2013, the administration said that more than 26,000 people had been reported disappeared or missing since 2007…Yet the government has made little progress in prosecuting widespread killings, enforced disappearances, and torture committed by soldiers and police in the course of efforts to combat organized crime, including during Peña Nieto’s tenure….Members of all security force branches continue to carry out disappearances during the Peña Nieto administration, in some cases collaborating directly with criminal groups. In June 2013, Mexico’s National Human Rights Commission (CNDH) said it was investigating 2,443 disappearances in which it had found evidence of the involvement of state agents…From December 2006 to mid-September 2013, the CNDH received 8,150 complaints of abuse by the army, and issued reports on 116 cases in which it found that army personnel had committed serious human rights violations.

“The soldiers who commit these abuses are virtually never brought to justice, largely because such cases continue to be investigated and prosecuted in the military justice system, which lacks independence and transparency…Torture is widely practiced in Mexico to obtain forced confessions and extract information. It is most frequently applied in the period between when victims are arbitrarily detained and when they are handed to prosecutors, when they are often held incommunicado at military bases or other illegal detention sites. Common tactics include beatings, waterboarding, electric shocks, and sexual torture. Many judges continue to accept confessions obtained through torture, despite the constitutional prohibition of such evidence.

“…Between January and September 2013, the National Human Rights Commission received more than 860 complaints of torture or cruel or inhuman treatment by federal officials…Prisons are overpopulated, unhygienic, and fail to provide basic security for most inmates. Prisoners who accuse guards or inmates of attacks or other abuses have no effective system to seek redress.

“Approximately 65 percent of prisons are controlled by organized crime, and corruption and violence are rampant, according to the CNDH. Some 108 inmates had died in 2013, as of November….At least 85 journalists were killed between 2000 and August 2013, and 20 more were disappeared between 2005 and April 2013, according to the CNDH…Independent unions are often blocked from entering negotiations with management, while workers who seek to form independent unions risk losing their jobs...Human rights defenders and activists continue to suffer harassment and attacks…In many cases, there is evidence—including witness testimony or traced cell phones—that state agents are involved in aggressions against human rights defenders…The UN special rapporteur on extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions conducted a fact-finding mission to Mexico in April-May 2013, and stated that extrajudicial executions by security forces were widespread and often occurred without accountability…”


So, not surprisingly, as recently as Nov. 8, 2014 Erika Guevara Rosas, Americas Director of Amnesty International--in response to the Nov. 8, 2014 statement by Mexican Attorney General Jesus Murillo Karam about the 43 Mexican students who disappeared in September 2014—noted that “tragically, the enforced disappearance of these student teachers is just the latest in a long line of horrors to have befallen Guerrero state, and the rest of the country;” and “the warning signs of corruption and violence have been there for all to see for years, and those that negligently ignored them are themselves complicit in this tragedy.”

(end of part 14)

Saturday, April 18, 2015

The `New York Times'' Mexican Billionaire Connection Revisited: Part 13


New York Times Owner Slim’s TracFone Connection

The May 10, 2013 Forbes magazine article also observed that New York Times Owner Slim’s TracFone Wireless Inc. mobile phone service firm—the fifth largest in the United States in 2009--was “the largest recipient under the U.S. Federal Communication Commission’s Lifeline program, taking in $451.7 million, or 28%, of payments in 2011, the last year for which records are available” and “has four million TracFone customers participating in the government phone assistance Lifeline program.”


An Oct. 7, 2013 Two Countries One Voice press release also noted that “on July 11, 2013, the California Public Utilities Commission fined New York Times Owner Slim’s TracFone $24 million and settled a battle that has drawn out in both the courts and before the California Public Utilities Commission surrounding the pay-as-you-go mobile provider’s failure to pay fees and surcharges that fund programs for the deaf and poor.” The same press release also observed that “in May 2013, Mexico’s Congress: finally “overwhelmingly passed a far reaching telecommunications reform bill designed to improve competition in Mexico’s phone industry, which is controlled by Carlos Slim,” but that the Two Countries One Voice activist group “will continue to be the voices for the voiceless, giving prominence to the plight of the poor, who are impacted by Slim’s practices.”.

(end of part 13)