Friday, February 5, 2016

Black Youth "Not Seasonally Adjusted" Unemployment Rate Increases To 25.5 Percent In January 2016

The official “not seasonally adjusted” unemployment rate for Black youth between 16 and 19 years-of-age increased from 21.2 to 25.5 percent between December 2015 and January 2016; while the number of unemployed Black youths between 16 and 19 years-of-age increased by 15,000 (from 150,000 to 166,000) during the same period, according to the “not seasonally adjusted” Bureau of Labor Statistics data. In addition, the “not seasonally adjusted” number of Black youths between 16 and 19 years-of-age who still had jobs decreased by 76,000 (from 560,000 to 484,000) between December 2015 and January 2016.
The “not seasonally adjusted” jobless rate for white youths between 16 and 19 years-of-age increased from 13 to 14.9 percent between December 2015 and January 2016; while the “not seasonally adjusted” number of unemployed white youths between 16 and 19 years-of-age increased by 71,000 (from 562,000 to 633,000) during the same period. In addition, the “not seasonally adjusted” number of white youths who still had jobs decreased by 154,000 (from 3,773,000 to 3,619,000) between December 2015 and January 2016.
Between December 2015 and January 2016, the official “not seasonally adjusted” unemployment rate for all youths between 16 and 19 years-of-age in the United States increased from 14.2 to 16.5 percent; while the “not seasonally adjusted” total number of unemployed youths between 16 and 19 years-of-age increased by 105,000 (from 782,000 to 885,000) during the same period. In addition, the “not seasonally adjusted” jobless rate for Latino youths between 16 and 19 years-of-age increased from 13.7 to 18.1 percent between December 2015 and January 2016; while the “not seasonally adjusted” number of unemployed Latino youths between 16 and 19 years-of-age increased by 57,000 (from 154,000 to 211,000) during the same period.

Between December 2015 and January 2016, the official “not seasonally adjusted” unemployment rate for Black male workers over 20 years-of-age in the United States increased from 8.7 to 9.1 percent; while the official “not seasonally adjusted” jobless rate for all Black workers (youth, male and female) in the United States increased from 8.1 to 9.1 percent during the same period. In addition, between December 2015 and January 2016, the “not seasonally adjusted” total number of unemployed Black workers in the United States increased by 188,000 (from 1,565,000 to 1,753,000)..

Between December 2015 and January 2016, the “not seasonally adjusted” number of unemployed Black female workers over 20 years-of-age in the United States increased by 142,000 (from 680,000 to 792,000); while the official “not seasonally adjusted” unemployment rate for Black female workers over 20 years-of-age increased from 6.6 to 8 percent during the same period.

The “not seasonally adjusted” number of unemployed Latino male workers over 20 years-of-age in the United States increased by 39,000 (from 835,000 to 874,000) between December 2015 and January 2016; while the “not seasonally adjusted” total number of unemployed Latino workers in the United States increased by 128,000 (from 1,619,000 to 1,747,000) during the same period.. In addition, the official “not seasonally adjusted” unemployment rate for all Latino workers (youth, male and female) in the United States increased from 6.2 to 6.6 percent between December 2015 and January 2016.

The official “not seasonally adjusted” jobless rate for Latina female workers over 20 years-of-age increased from 5.9 to 6.2 between December 2015 and January 2016; while the “not seasonally adjusted” number of  unemployed Latina female workers over 20 years-of-age in the United States increased by 33,000 (from 629,000 to 662,000) during the same period.

The “not seasonally adjusted” number of  Asian-American workers not in the U.S. labor force increased by 260,000 (from 5,367,000 to 5,627,000) between December 2015 and January 2016; while the unemployment rate for Asian-American workers was still 3.7 percent during the same period, according to the “not seasonally adjusted” data.

Between December 2015 and January 2016, the official “not seasonally adjusted” jobless rate for all white workers (youth, male and female) in the United States increased from 4.2 to 4.7 percent; while the “not seasonally adjusted” total number of unemployed white workers in the United States increased by 535,000 (from 5,244,000 to 5,779,000) during the same period. In addition, the official “not seasonally adjusted” unemployment rate for white male workers over 20 years-of-age in the United States increased from 4.2 to 4.5 percent between December 2015 and January 2016; while the official “not seasonally adjusted” number of jobless white male workers over 20 years-of-age increased by 114,000 (from 2,718,000 to 2,904,000) during the same period.

The “not seasonally adjusted” number of unemployed white female workers over 20 years-of-age in the United States increased by 78,000 (from 1,964,000 to 2,242,000) between December 2015 and January 2016; while the “not seasonally adjusted” jobless rate for white female workers over 20 years-of-age increased from 3.6 to 4.1 percent during the same period. In addition, the “not seasonally adjusted” number of white female workers over 20 years-of-age who still had jobs decreased by 26,000 (from 52,596,000 to 52,570,000) between December 2015 and January 2016..

Between December 2015 and January 2016, the “not seasonally adjusted” jobless rate for all female workers over 16 years-of-age in the United States increased from 4.4 to 5.1 percent; while the official “not seasonally adjusted” unemployment rate for all female workers over 20 years-of-age increased from 4.1 to 4.7 percent during the same period. In addition, the number of unemployed female workers over 16 years-of-age in the United States increased by 479,000 (from 3,262,000 to 3,741,000) between December 2015 and January 2016, according to the “not seasonally adjusted” data.

The official “not seasonally adjusted” unemployment rate for all male workers over 16 years-of-age in the United States increased from 5.1 to 5.5 between December 2015 and January 2016; while the official “not seasonally adjusted” unemployment rate for all male workers over 20 years-of-age increased from 4.8 to 5.1 percent  during the same period.. In addition, the “not seasonally adjusted” number of all unemployed male workers over 16 years-of-age in the United States increased by 289,000 (from 4,280,000 to 4,569,000) between December 2015 and January 2016; while the “not seasonally adjusted” number of unemployed male workers over 20 years-of-age increased by 251,00 (from 3,836,000 to 4,087,000) during the same period..

In January 2016, 8,309,000 workers in the United States were officially unemployed, according to the “not seasonally adjusted” data; and between December 2015 and January 2016 the “not seasonally adjusted”” unemployment rate for all U.S. workers (male, female and youth) increased from 4.8 to 5.3 percent.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ February 5, 2016 press release:

“…Employment declined in private educational services, transportation and warehousing, and mining…

“The number of long-term unemployed (those jobless for 27 weeks or more) was essentially unchanged in January, at 2.1 million, and has shown little movement since June. These individuals accounted for 26.9 percent of the unemployed…

“The number of persons employed part time for economic reasons (sometimes referred to as involuntary part-time workers) was little changed at 6.0 million in January…These individuals, who would have preferred full-time employment, were working part time because their hours had been cut back or because they were unable to find full-time jobs.

“In January, 2.1 million persons were marginally attached to the labor force…These individuals were not in the labor force, wanted and were available for work, and had looked for a job sometime in the prior 12 months. They were not counted as unemployed because they had not searched for work work in the 4 weeks preceding the survey.

“Among the marginally attached, there were 623,000 discouraged workers in January…Discouraged workers are persons not currently looking for work because they believe no jobs are available for them…

“Private educational services lost 39,000 jobs in January due to larger than normal seasonal layoffs.

“Employment in transportation and warehousing decreased by 20,000 in January. Most of the loss occurred among couriers and messengers (-14,000), reflecting larger than usual layoffs….

“Employment in mining continued to decline in January (-7,000)…Since…September 2014, employment in the industry has fallen by 146,000, or 17 percent…

“…Employment in temporary help services edged down in January (-25,000)…Employment in other major industries, including construction, wholesale trade, and government, changed little over the month……


“…Employment gains in November and December combined were 2,000 lower than previously reported…”

Saturday, January 9, 2016

Black Youth "Seasonally Adjusted" Unemployment Rate Increases To 23.7 Percent In December 2015

The official “seasonally adjusted” unemployment rate for Black youth between 16 and 19 years-of-age increased from 23.5 to 23.7 percent between November and December 2015; while the number of unemployed Black youths between 16 and 19 years-of-age increased by 13,000 (from 161,000 to 174,000) during the same period, according to the “seasonally adjusted” and revised Bureau of Labor Statistics data. In addition, the “seasonally adjusted” jobless rate for white youths between 16 and 19 years-of-age increased from 13.5 to 14.9 percent between November and December 2015; while the number of unemployed white youths between 16 and 19 years-of-age increased by 97,000 (from 590,000 to 687,000) during the same period.

Between November and December 2015, the official “seasonally adjusted” unemployment rate for all youths between 16 and 19 years-of-age in the United States increased from 15.6 to 16.1 percent; while the “seasonally adjusted” total number of unemployed youths between 16 and 19 years-of-age increased to 938,000 in December 2015. In addition, the “seasonally adjusted” jobless rate for Latino youths between 16 and 19 years-of-age was still 16.5 percent in December 2015; while the “seasonally adjusted” number of unemployed Latino youths between 16 and 19 years-of-age increased by 10,000 (from 183,000 to 193,000) between November and December 2015.

In December 2015, the official “seasonally adjusted” unemployment rate for Black male workers over 20 years-of-age in the United States was still 8.7 percent; while the official “seasonally adjusted” jobless rate for all Black workers (youth, male and female) in the United States was still 8.3 percent during that same month. In addition, between November and December 2015, the “seasonally adjusted” number of Black workers not in the U.S. labor force increased by 42,000 (from 12,110,000 to 12,152,000).

Between November and December 2015, the “seasonally adjusted” number of Black female workers over 20 years-of-age in the U.S. labor force decreased by 81,000 (from 10,009,000 to 9,928,000); while the official “seasonally adjusted” unemployment rate for Black female workers over 20 years-of-age was still 6.9 percent in December 2015.

The “seasonally adjusted” number of unemployed Latino male workers over 20 years-of-age in the United States increased by 19,000 (from 776,000 to 795,000) between November and December 2015; while the “seasonally adjusted” number of Latino workers not in the U.S. labor force increased by 41,000 (from 13,780,000 to 13,821,000). In addition, the official “seasonally adjusted” unemployment rate for all Latino workers (youth, male and female) in the United States was still 6.3 percent in December 2015; while the official “seasonally adjusted” jobless rate for Latina female workers over 20 years-of-age was also still 6.3 percent during that same month.

Between November and December 2015, the “seasonally adjusted” number of Latina female workers over 20 years-of-age in the U.S. labor force decreased by 108,000 (from 10,754,000 to 10,646,000); while the “seasonally adjusted” number of Latina female workers who still had jobs decreased by 53,000 (from 10,031,000 to 9,978,000) during the same period.

The “seasonally adjusted” number of  unemployed Asian-American workers in the United States increased by 9,000 (from 354,000 to 363,000) between  November and December 2015; while the unemployment rate for Asian-American workers increased from 3.9 to 4 percent during the same period, according to the “seasonally adjusted” data. In addition, the “seasonally adjusted” number of Asian-American workers not in the U.S. labor force increased by 41,000 (from 5,344,000 to 5,385,000) between November and December 2015.

Between November and December 2015, the official “seasonally adjusted” jobless rate for all white workers (youth, male and female) in the United States increased from 4.4 to 4.5 percent; while the “seasonally adjusted” total number of unemployed white workers in the United States increased by 139,000 (from 5,381,000 to 5,520,000) during the same period. In addition, the official “seasonally adjusted” unemployment rate for white male workers over 20 years-of-age in the United States increased from 4.1 to 4.2 percent between November and December 2015; while the official “seasonally adjusted” number of jobless white male workers over 20 years-of-age increased by 83,000 (from 2,619,000 to 2,702,000) during the same period.

The “seasonally adjusted” number of white female workers over 20 years-of-age in the U.S. labor force decreased by 117,000 (from 54,638,000 to 54,521,000) between November and December 2015; while the “seasonally adjusted” jobless rate for white female workers over 20 years-of-age was still 3.9 percent in December 2015. In addition, the “seasonally adjusted” number of white female workers over 20 years-of-age who still had jobs decreased by 75,000 (from 52,466,000 to 52, 391,000) between November and December 2015.

In December 2015, the “seasonally adjusted” jobless rate for all female workers over 16 years-of-age in the United States was still 4.8 percent;; while the official “seasonally adjusted” unemployment rate for all female workers over 20 years-of-age was still 4.4 percent during that same month. In addition, the number of female workers over 20 years-of-age in the U.S. labor force decreased by 70,000 (from 71,139,000 to 71,069,000) between November and December 2015, according to the “seasonally adjusted” data.

The official “seasonally adjusted” unemployment rate for all male workers over 16 years-of-age in the United States  was still 5.2 percent in December 2015; while the official “seasonally adjusted” unemployment rate for all male workers over 20 years-of-age was still 4.7 percent  during that same month.. In addition, the “seasonally adjusted” number of all unemployed male workers over 16 years-of-age in the United States increased by 9,000 (from 4,323,000 to 4,330,000) between November and December 2015; while the “seasonally adjusted” number of unemployed male workers over 20 years-of-age increased by 8,000 (from 3,800,000 to 3,808,000) during the same period..

In December 2015, 7,904,000 workers in the United States were officially unemployed, according to the “seasonally adjusted” data; and the “seasonally adjusted”” unemployment rate for all U.S. workers (male, female and youth) was still  5 percent during that same month.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ January 8, 2016 press release:

“…The unemployment rate was unchanged at 5.0 percent…Mining employment continued to decline…Seasonally adjusted household survey data have been revised…

“The number of unemployed persons, at 7.9 million, was essentially unchanged in December…The rates for adult men (4.7 percent), adult women (4.4 percent), teenagers (16.1 percent), whites (4.5 percent), Asians (4.0 percent), and Hispanics (6.3 percent) showed little or no change…

“The number of long-term unemployed (those jobless for 27 weeks or more) was essentially unchanged at 2.1 million in December and accounted for 26.3 percent of the unemployed. The number of long-term unemployed has shown little movement since June…The civilian labor force participation rate, at 62.6 percent, was little changed in December and has shown little movement in recent months…

“The number of persons employed part time for economic reasons (sometimes referred to as involuntary part-time workers) was little changed at 6.0 million in December…These individuals, who would have preferred full-time employment, were working part time because their hours had been cut back or because they were unable to find a full-time job…

“In December, 1.8 million persons were marginally attacked to the labor force…These individuals…wanted and were available for work, and had looked for a job sometime in the prior 12 months. They were not counted as unemployed because they had not searched for work in the 4 weeks preceding the survey.

“Among the marginally attached, there were 663,000 discouraged workers in December, little changed from a year earlier…Discouraged workers are persons not currently looking for work because they believe no jobs are available for them…

“Employment in mining continued to decline in December (-8,000)…Mining lost 129,000 jobs in 2015, with most of the loss in support activities for mining


“Manufacturing employment changed little in December. Employment in…wholesale trade, retail trade, financial activities, and government, changed little over the month…”

Friday, January 8, 2016

Donald Trump's Democratic Party Campaign Contributions Revisited

In 2016, billionaire real estate dealmaker and television celebrity Donald Trump is campaigning for the 2016 presidential nomination of a Republican Party whose candidates for federal office have historically received hundreds of thousands of dollars in campaign contributions from Trump since 1990, according to the Center for Responsive Politics' Open Secrets website data.

For example:

1. On August 19, 2012, Donald Trump gave a $100,000 campaign contribution to the GOP's Congressional Leadership Fund political action committee [PAC];

2. On October 6, 2010, Donald Trump gave a $50,000 campaign contribution to the GOP's American Crossroads PAC;

3. On May 21, 2013, Donald Trump gave a $50,000 campaign contribution to the GOP's Kentuckians for Strong Leadership PAC;

4. On December 24, 1999, Donald Trump gave a $50,000 campaign to the GOP's Donald J. Trump New York Delegate Committee PAC;

5. Between March 29, 2013 and June 9, 2014, Donald Trump gave 2 campaign contributions, totaling $64,800, to the Republican National Committee [RNC];

6. Between April 6, 2011 and April 9, 2014, Donald Trump gave 4 campaign contributions, totaling $126,400, to the National Republican Senatorial Campaign Committee;

7. Between May 29, 2008 and July 26, 2012, Donald Trump gave 2 campaign contributions, totaling $59,200, to the Republican National Committee [RNC]; and

8. On August 23, 2010, Donald Trump gave a $30,400 campaign contribution to the National Republican Senatorial Committee.

Yet 2016 Republican Party presidential candidate Trump has, historically, also contributed--and Democratic Party politicians, campaign committees and PACs have, historically, accepted--hundreds of thousands of dollars in campaign contributions to the campaign committees and PACs of Democratic Party candidates for federal office.

For example:

1. Between October 8, 2002 and November 3, 2008, the Democratic Party's Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee accepted 7 campaign contributions, totaling $97,000, from 2016 Republican Party presidential candidate Donald Trump;

2. Between June 17, 2000 and December 31, 2007, the Democratic Party's Democratic Congressional Committee accepted 6 campaign contributions, totaling $43,050, from 2016 Republican Party presidential candidate Donald Trump;

3.  On April 13, 2005, the Democratic Party's New Jersey First PAC accepted a $5,000 campaign contribution from 2016 Republican Party presidential candidate Donald Trump;

4. On September 20, 2010, the Democratic Party's Democratic Committee of New York State accepted a $10,000 campaign contribution from 2016 Republican Party presidential candidate Donald Trump;

5. Between November 2 1994 and September 25, 1998, the Democratic National Committee [DNC] accepted 2 campaign contributions, totaling $15,000, from 2016 Republican Party presidential candidate Donald Trump;

6. Between October 26, 1993 and April 24, 1998, the Democratic Party's Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee accepted 4 campaign contributions, totaling $21,000, from 2016 Republican Party presidential candidate Donald Trump;

7. Between March 5, 1990 and October 29, 1999, the Democratic Party's Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee accepted 5 campaign contributions, totaling $18,600, from 2016 Republican Party presidential candidate Donald Trump;

8. On April 30, 2008 Democratic Party politician Robert Andrews accepted a $6,900 campaign contribution from 2016 Republican Party presidential candidate Donald Trump;

9. Between August 26, 1998 and March 1, 2006 the Democratic Party's National Leadership PAC accepted 5 campaign contributions, totaling $9,000, from 2016 Republican Party presidential candidate Donald Trump;

10. Between May 1, 2002 and November 12, 2007, 2016 Democratic Party presidential candidate Hillary Clinton accepted 8 campaign contributions, totaling $10,660, from 2016 Republican Party presidential candidate Donald Trump;

11. Between March 21, 1989 and June 24, 2003, 2004 Democratic Party presidential candidate John Kerry accepted 4 campaign contributions, totaling $4,000, from 2016 Republican Party presidential candidate Donald Trump;

12. On December 31, 2001, 2012 Democratic Party vice-presidential candidate Joe Biden accepted a $1,000 campaign contribution from 2016 Republican Party presidential candidate Donald Trump;

13. Between June 14, 1989 and March 26, 2009, Democratic Senator Harry Reid accepted 6 campaign contributions, totaling $9,400, from 2016 Republican Party presidential candidate Donald Trump;

14. Between February 25, 1999 and April 7, 2010, Democratic Senator Chuck Schumer accepted 8 campaign contributions, totaling $9,250, from 2016 Republican Party presidential candidate Donald Trump;

15. Between April 25, 1990 and August 27, 2007, Democratic Congressional Representative Charles Rangel accepted 12 campaign contributions, totaling $18,600, from 2016 Republican Party presidential candidate Donald Trump; and

16. Between June 14, 1993 and December 19, 2003, now-deceased Democratic Senator Ted Kennedy accepted 5 campaign contributions, totaling $5,000, from 2016 Republican Party presidential candidate Donald Trump.

Saturday, January 2, 2016

Donald Trump's Funding of Ex-NYC Democratic Mayor Dinkins' 1980's Campaigns Revisited

In 2016, billionaire real estate dealmaker and tv celebrity Donald Trump is campaigning for the 2016 Republican Party presidential nomination.  Yet during the 1980's, Trump apparently contributed a lot of money to help fund the election campaigns of Democratic Party politicians in New York City like former Democratic New York City Mayor David Dinkins. As the 1992 book by former Village Voice reporter Wayne Barrett, Trump: The Deals and The Downfall, noted:

"...Though Trump was the largest individual giver in city and state elections from the mid-seventies on, he had voted only three times, routinely skipping even presidential elections...

"When David Dinkins...ran for Manhattan borough president in 1985...Donald [Trump] wanted to help Dinkins without surfacing...So Nick Ribis and several other Trump aides, particularly unknown casino brass from Atlantic City, dumped thousands into the Dinkins coffers without getting noticed. Trump's partner [real estate developer Abe] Hirschfield hosted Dinkins's headquarters in his midtown hotel while simultaneously financing the entry into the race of a second white candidate who had no chance to win but could only help Dinkins, who is Black...Donald [Trump]...did raise $20,000 for GOP candidate [for NYC Mayor] Rudy Giuliani [in 1989), co-chairing one fund-raiser at the Waldorf-Astoria in the spring...Even while he endorsed Giuliani he had Tony Gliedman, as an old tennis buddy of David Dinkins, heading a real estate fund-raising committee for the Dinkins campaign...".

And in its December 7, 1988 issue, the New York Times reported that "Donald Trump" was "prepared to spend $2 million of his money on anti-Koch television commercials in next year's mayoral race," in which Dinkins subsequently defeated former New York City Mayor Koch in the Democratic Party's mayoralty primary.


Sunday, December 27, 2015

Donald Trump's Historical Cuomo Dynaty-NY Democratic Party Connection Revisited--Part 2

The son of 20th-century millionaire real estate dealmaker Fred Trump [II]--celebrity real estate dealmaker and billionaire Donald Trump--wants to be nominated by the Republican Party National Convention to be the Republican Party candidate for U.S. president in the November 2016 U.S. presidential election.

Yet, ironically, members of the Trump family were apparently business associates, campaign contributors/fund-raisers, or political allies of current Democratic New York Governor Andrew Cuomo and Andrew Cuomo's father, former Democratic New York Governor Mario Cuomo, historically. And the Trump family's private real estate dealmaking firm apparently profited, historically from Fred Trump [II] and Donald Trump's 20th-century connection to the Cuomo Dynasty and New York State's Democratic Party. As the 1992 book by former Village Voice reporter Wayne Barrett, Trump: The Deals and The Downfall revealed:

"The retention of the Falcone [law] firm was hardly Trump's only Cuomo move. In November 1985, Donald [Trump] hired Albany Lobbyist and former [NY State] transportation commissioner Bill Hennessy, who'd just resigned as chairman of the [New York] state Democratic Party...When Cuomo's [NY State] Thruway Authority chairman resigned in 1987, the governor appointed Hennessy immediately and permitted him to remain a 90 percent partner in his lobbying firm, which continued to lobby state agencies...On a $2,000-a-month retainer, plus a $500 per diem rate, the Hennessy firm's main job for Trump was to lobby some of the very transportation officials he [Hennessy] had appointed...

"As potent as the Falcone and Hennessy combination was, Donald [Trump] did not stop there. In the spring of 1986, Trump hired UDC [Urban Development Corporation]'s in-house counsel, Susan Heilbron...The two first discussed the job while they sat together in December 1985 during...talks. Well known at the top levels of the Cuomo administration, Heilbron helped engineer the selection of her best friend as [UDC Director] Tese's new counsel, Joanne Gentile...

"Trump also tried, over a period of 6 months in 1986 and 1987, to lure Sandy Frucher into his lair. Frucher, one of the governor's half-dozen top advisers, eventually declined, after countless courting sessions.

"On Falcone's recommendation, Sive Paget & Riesel, the...environmental law firm Trump retained..., hired Richard Gordon, the executive director of the Friends of Mario Cuomo. Gordon, who had worked with the Cuomos since the 1982 campaign, remained director of the campaign committee, even though his law firm had a multiplicity of matters before state agencies.

"Trump's most unusual reach, however, was for a very special driver and bodyguard, Joe Anastasi...Anastasi had been Mario Cuomo's personal bodyguard for years, starting when [Mario] Cuomo was lieutenant governor, and had accompanied him throughout the 1982 [NY] gubernatorial campaign, starting most mornings in [Mario] Cuomo's kitchen in Queens...After [Mario] Cuomo became governor, Anastasi was on his security detail in New York City...

"In 1986, Anastasi began accompanying Trump on various trips around the country...Lucille Falcone hosted the annual Cuomo fund-raiser at the Sheraton. Trump bought the most expensive ringside table...Trump was Cuomo's biggest 1989 corporate giver, donating $25,000.

"A few nights after the fund-raiser, Donald [Trump] went to a second, private Cuomo affair--Andrew Cuomo's birthday party at a midtown pub. The party was cohosted by one of Andrew [Cuomo]'s closest friends, Dan Klores, the...aid to public relations czar Howard Rubenstein, who had handled the Trump account for years...Donald [Trump]...spoke to...Andrew [Cuomo] for a half hour. Andrew [Cuomo] would later claim that it was the first time he'd ever met Trump...It was just one more rhetorical Cuomo ploy--hiding a compromising business arrangement behind the supposed detachment of personal distance...

"Over the years, Donald [Trump] had devised a strategy for every significant public official in his path: the seduction of the elusive [Mario] Cuomo had simply been the most manipulative and extended..."